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  3. If you follow any of our social media or are part of the RKSL Discord you may have already seen some or most of these. But may not understand whats actually going on. Recently MikePhoenix approach me asking about doing a joint project. A completely new Queen Elizabeth carrier. Something we both think the game needs. The more British kit the better. Now this is a big project. Its over 280m long, 73m wide, Is a bloody awkward shape to model and it's going to use a lot of polygons. Mike and I are splitting the load between us. Mike is doing the two islands and I'm doing the hull. After that we are sharing the load and making parts and details as needed. To answer some of the questions people have already asked. Q1) Will he have a hanger deck? A1) Yes. Q2) Will it have capaults? A2) Yes and no. The real carrier does not. but due to game engine/AI limits there will probably have to be a "'mock' catapult so that mission makers can launch planes etc. Q3) Does the ramp actually work? A3) Yes. But there are limits. Planes either need to be given reinforced landing gear and setup for it or be speed limited to prevent explosions. Q4) Will it be moveable? A4) No, its simply too big its a static object just like the BI Carrier. Q5) Will it have all the rooms and bays? A5) Nope. it's just too much work to do that. but it will have some keys areas, the Hanger deck, briefing rooms. Boat bays and other practical areas. Q6) Is it going to be armed? A6) Yes, Phalanx, 30mm Cannon, GPMG and if we get time M134 Miniguns. Q7) Do we get an F-35B with it at release? A7) Probably not at the same time. But there is one coming. Check out Mike's Twitter for updates from him https://twitter.com/MikePhoeniX and mine from me. https://twitter.com/RKSL_Rock And feel free to join our discord channels for the latest stuff. RKSL Discord - https://discordapp.com/invite/YegMy24 Mike's Polygon Factory - https://discord.gg/nxxMRZG Thanks for looking. Mike and Rock
  4. MikePhoeniX & I are working on a brand new Queen Elizabeth Carrier model and I needed something to test ramps and STOVL setups with. So I dug out my old Harrier GR9 #rksl #wip #arma3 #testing
  5. Earlier
  6. I discovered a new forum - at least previously unknown to me - where someone was loudly broadcasting his mistaken belief that I have lied about the LPD. So for my loyal and possibly disloyal followers is the old ALPHA ingame. Its fair to say my focus has been a bit all over the show recently. And that's for various reasons you aren't really interested in. But needless to say the LPD has never really been out of WIP. Its just been slow going. Trying to find ways around the game engine limits and issues. Right now the main issue is roadways. For those not of the modding persuasion these are the defined areas that you may walk or drive upon in a model. Now the issue here is that once you place a roadway on top of another the game engine doesn't like it. At least for some things. So lets imagine this. Each deck has a roadway: _______________ Flight Deck _____________ _______________ Deck 1 ________________ _______________ Well deck ____________ \___LCU MK10____/ or \__LCVP__/ Either an Vehicle-In-Vehicle enabled LCU or LCVP carrying a vehicle enters the well deck. Try to unload and the game engine can't work out which deck to put it on and spawns it (typically) off to the right of the ship above the water. You are now down one vehicle. This is a bit of a problem, Its one that can't be solved when using VIV without a game engine change. The fix is to reply on PhysX. Now this comes with problems too. Depending on the speed of your PC results may vary. Dodgy physx calcs can result in the LCU and vehicle its carrying being fired across the map... cue hilarious A3 video montage of flying tanks and subs. etc. Aside from the usual issue of geometry limits, dodgy configs, scripting and a myriad of other things this problem is the reason i haven't released the LPD or had much motivation to work on it as a priority. Anyway, here's some WIP pics.
  7. V3.070 - Fix for the Fix

    AW159 V3.070 Now out on steam!
  8. bin\config.bin/CfgMovesMaleSdr/States/RKSLA3_AW159_Pilot.interpolateTo: Bad move RKSLA3_AW159_Pilot_Dead View full bug
  9. bin\config.bin/CfgMovesMaleSdr/States/RKSLA3_AW159_Pilot.interpolateTo: Bad move RKSLA3_AW159_Pilot_Dead
  10. The current model is the original dev build while the RN uses a new more aerodynamic wing with a pitch and different profile. View full bug
  11. The current model is the original dev build while the RN uses a new more aerodynamic wing with a pitch and different profile.
  12. Its out. AW159 Wildcat BETA. (It my Birthday and I'm feeling generous-ish) #rksl #wip #beta #release #ArmA3official https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=1852631379
  13. Wildcat AW159: Quick update

    That is understandable!
  14. Wildcat AW159: Quick update

    Sorry but we've been bitten too often in the past to share with groups like this. Someone always leaks it and ruins it for everyone else. 15 years of doing this has taught me to trust my friends. So its invitation only and always will be,
  15. Wildcat AW159: Quick update

    Right, I see. I was hoping it would be a little bit more open than that. I was actually hoping you'd allow the most active Royal Marines MilSim to test mods as part of our exclusive modpack (Which is only available to members, and is exclusive in regards to our own British Army based content). If this could be of some possibilty, I would be more than happy to put you in contact with the MilSim's owner! https://rmmu.co.uk/
  16. How To Operate a Helicopter Mechanic A long, long time ago, back in the days of iron men and wooden rotor blades, a ritual began. It takes place when a helicopter pilot approaches a mechanic to report some difficulty with his aircraft. All mechanics seem to be aware of it, which leads to the conclusion that it's included somewhere in their training, and most are diligent in practicing it. New pilots are largely ignorant of the ritual because it's neither included in their training, nor handed down to them by older drivers. Older drivers feel that the pain of learning everything the hard way was so exquisite, that they shouldn't deny anyone the pleasure. There are pilots who refuse to recognize it as a serious professional amenity, no matter how many times they perform it, and are driven to distraction by it. Some take it personally. They get red in the face, fume and boil, and do foolish dances. Some try to take it as a joke, but it's always dead serious. Most pilots find they can't change it, and so accept it and try to practice it with some grace. The ritual is accomplished before any work is actually done on the aircraft. It has four parts, and goes something like this: 1. The pilot reports the problem. The mechanic says, There's nothing wrong with it." 2. The pilot repeats the complaint. The mechanic replies, "It's the gauge." 3. The pilot persists, plaintively. The mechanic Maintains, "They're all like that." 4. The pilot, heatedly now, explains the problem carefully, enunciating carefully. The mechanic states, "I can't fix it." After the ritual has been played through in it's entirety, serious discussion begins, and the problem is usually solved forthwith. Like most rituals, this one has it's roots in antiquity and a basis in experience and common sense. It started back when mechanics first learned to operate pilots, and still serves a number of purposes. It's most important function is that it is a good basic diagnostic technique. Causing the pilot to explain the symptoms of the problem several times in increasing detail not only saves troubleshooting time, but gives the mechanic insight into the pilot's knowledge of how the machine works, and his state of mind. Every mechanic knows that if the if the last flight was performed at night or in bad weather, some of the problems reported are imagined, some exaggerated, and some are real. Likewise, a personal problem, especially romantic or financial, but including simple fatigue, affects a pilot's perception of every little rattle and thump. There are also chronic whiners complainers to be weeded out and dealt with. While performing the ritual, an unscrupulous mechanic can find out if the pilot can be easily intimidated. If the driver has an obvious personality disorder like prejudices, pet peeves, tender spots, or other manias, they will stick out like handles, with which he can be steered around. There is a proper way to operate a mechanic as well. Don't confuse "operating" a mechanic with "putting one in his place." The worst and most often repeated mistake is to try to establish an "I'm the pilot and you're just the mechanic" hierarchy. Although a lot of mechanics can and do fly recreationally, they give a damn about doing it for a living. Their satisfaction comes from working on complex and expensive machinery. As a pilot, you are neither feared nor envied, but merely tolerated, for until they actually train monkeys to fly those things, he needs a pilot to put the parts in motion so he can tell if everything is working properly. The driver who tries to put a mech in his "place" is headed for a fall. Sooner or later, he'll try to crank with the blade tied down. After he has snatched the tailboom around to the cabin door and completely burnt out the engine, he'll see the mech there sporting a funny little smirk. Helicopter mechanics are indifferent to attempts at discipline or regimentation other than the discipline of their craft. It's accepted that a good mechanic's personality should contain unpredictable mixtures of irascibility and nonchalance, and should exhibit at least some bizarre behavior. The basic operation of a mechanic involves four steps: 1. Clean an aircraft. Get out a hose or bucket, a broom, and some rags, and at some strange time of day, like early morning, or when you would normally take your afternoon nap) start cleaning that bird from top to bottom, inside and out. This is guaranteed to knock even the sourest old wrench off balance. He'll be suspicious, but he'll be attracted to this strange behavior like a passing motorist to a roadside accident. He may even join in to make sure you don't break anything. Before you know it , you'll be talking to each other about the aircraft while you're getting a more intimate knowledge of it. Maybe while you're mucking out the pilot's station, you'll see how rude it is to leave coffee cups, candy wrappers, cigarette butts, and other trash behind to be cleaned up. 2. Do a thorough pre-flight. Most mechanics are willing to admit to themselves that they might make a mistake, and since a lot of his work must be done at night or in a hurry, a good one likes to have his work checked. Of course he'd rather have another mech do the checking, but a driver is better than nothing. Although they cultivate a deadpan, don't-give-a-damn attitude, mechanics have nightmares about forgetting to torque a nut or leaving tools in inlets and drive shaft tunnels. A mech will let little gigs slide on a machine that is never pre-flighted, not because they won't be noticed, but because he figures the driver will overlook something big someday, and the whole thing will end up in a smoking pile of rubble anyway. 3. Don't abuse the machinery. Mechanics see drivers come and go, so you won't impress one in a thousand with what you can make the aircraft do. They all know she'll lift more than max gross, and will do a hammerhead with half roll. While the driver is confident that the blades and engine and massive frame members will take it, the mech knows that it's the seals and bearings and rivets deep in the guts of the machine that fail from abuse. In a driver mechanics aren't looking for fancy expensive clothes, flashy girlfriends, tricky maneuvers, and lots of juicy stories about Viet Nam. They're looking for one who'll fly the thing so that all the components make their full service life. They also know that high maintenance costs are a good excuse to keep salaries low. 4. Do a post-flight inspection. Nothing feels more deliciously dashing than to end the day by stepping down from the bird and walking off into the sunset while the blade slowly turns down. It's the stuff that beer commercials are made of. The trouble is, it leaves the pilot ignorant of how the aircraft has fared after a hard days work, and leaves the wrench doing a slow burn. The mechanic is an engineer, not a groom, and needs some fresh, first hand information on the aircraft's performance if he is to have it ready to go the next day. A little end-of-the-day conference also gives you one more chance to get him in the short ribs. Tell him the thing flew good. It's been known to make them faint dead away. As you can see, operating a helicopter mechanic is simple, but it is not easy. What it boils down to is that if a pilot performs his pilot rituals religiously in no time at all he will find the mechanic operating smoothly. (I have not attempted to explain how to make friends with a mechanic, for that is not known.) Helicopter pilots and mechanics have a strange relationship. It's a symbiotic partnership because one's job depends on the other, but it's an adversary situation too, since one's job is to provide the helicopter with loving care, and the other's is to provide wear and tear. Pilots will probably always regard mechanics as lazy, lecherous, intemperate swine who couldn't make it through flight school, and mechanics will always be convinced that pilots are petulant children with pathological ego problems, a big watch, and a little whatchamacallit. Both points of view are viciously slanderous, of course, and only partly true. by William C. Dykes Jolly Green
  17. Been quiet for a while...again. Wildcat is still plodding on. I've recently had an unplanned & unwanted 'holiday' cut off from my project drive but i've not wasted my time while confined to bed. Managed to get a few other bits done & started more floaty things #rksl #arma3 #wip
  18. Wildcat AW159: Quick update

    Invitation only I'm afraid.
  19. Wildcat AW159: Quick update

    How does one get to become a mod tester?
  20. Several people have been asking for an AW159 update. I don't have anything pretty that demonstrates progress so here is the Project summary sheet. Phases: ALPHA : Two blocks to reach alpha. #1 Model/Script/Config created and #2 ingame = Alpha. BETA: Three blocks. #1intial Testing #2 Reworks #3 Testing. If the testing fails it reverts to the previous block. RC (Release Candidate): #1 Textures and Scripts working as spec. #2Play testing. #3Reworks and improvements. GOLD: #1 Final release standard QA #2 Play testing #3 Reworks and improvements. PUBLIC: Final QA phase and that's it for release. All the bars go green and it out for release. NOTES: The winch option is reliant on a script that is only just a simple concept at this time and may not make it into the first release. I haven't done the AH1 model changes yet because there is no point until the HMA2 is complete as the AH1 is pretty much a HMA2 with bits deleted. The CRV7 and LAU pods are still in RC as the pods need repainting Torpedos and Depth Charges are not show as they are not working at this time and will be included at a later release when ive got a decent solution for them. Hope that satisfies. Rock
  21. Actually its BI problem. check the stock UAVs. They all do it. In the unreleased version i've deleted the lights completely.
  22. Yes I know yet another project but its not as bad as you may think. Im sick of the GPMG and M3M Loding. Its not fun so been taking a break = New Merlin HC4, interior progress...nowhere near done. Proper WIP update soon. #wip #rksl #MerlinHC4 #arma3official
  23. Wildcat HMA Mk2

    Yes they are going on the LCVP. The final planned update for the LCVP has me fixing a few things and some texture tweaks and adding in a version with the GPMGs on the shielded mounts. Personally i dont like them. They are so hard to use when its rough as they aren't as flexible as FFV turrets In testing no one wanted to use them but you can see for yourself soon.
  24. Wildcat HMA Mk2

    Since you've made an all new GPMG model, do you think you'll be slapping it on the Mk5 as well? Or are you done and dusted with that?
  25. Wildcat HMA Mk2

    Ah... nice twitter banner!
  26. Wildcat HMA Mk2

    Amazing you can actually do something like that. I'll search FB and Twitter. Thanks for the update.
  27. Wildcat HMA Mk2

    LMAO the BI "wildcat" has been triggering me since i first saw it in ArmA2. You are not alone. My Wildcat is coming along slowly. its at the frustrating stage of fixing all the niggles and bugs is just taking time. Often fix a bug and 3 more popup. I'm just doing the guns and the last few modelling and config bits. You can see some of the later updates on Twitter or Facebook. I've had to make a whole new GPMG for it. Same with the M3M. It is dependant of my free time and motivation. Both of which depend on the day.
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